Sharm El Shaken

All flights from the UK to and fro Sharm El Sheikh have been halted, temporarily by the government following a Russian plane, Metrojet 9268, that crashed in Sinai.

It is suspected that an explosive device had caused this crash, killing all 224 passenger and crew on board.

What does this mean for you if you are in Sharm or due to travel?

If you are currently in Sharm, you are best to contact your resort rep or travel agent for advice.

If you are due to travel, firstly check with your airline or tour operator that your flight is still scheduled. If you no longer wish to travel, you will need to inquire with whomever you booked with for a refund. Currently the foreign office has not changed its advice on travel to the Red Sea resort, which usually means travel insurance may not cover you for cancellation, but you definitely should still check this out.

[UPDATE]: 5th November.

The foreign office has now revised their advice on travel to Sharm El Sheikh to avoid all but essential travel. The good news here is that your travel insurance should be covering cancellation.

Please note, travel to other parts of Egypt is currently still perfectly OK. A lot of media are stating travel travel to ‘Egypt’ is affected, but this is only Sharm El Sheikh at present.

Do you fly more than once a year? Get ready to pay more tax…

Do you fly more than once a year? Get ready to pay more tax…

  
In the recent national controversial debates with regards to the planned expansion of London Aiports (Heathrow and Gatwick) and the effects it will have on our environment, another solution may have been found. Green Peace MP, Caroline Lucas has, for some time, been backing an idea of replacing APD (Air Passenger Duty, which is basically the bulk of the tax we all pay when we fly) with FFL (Frequent Flyer Levy).

The idea behind this scheme is that the people who fly the most will pay more tax than those who take an annual holiday. It is thought the most frequent flyers are just 15% of the population but they take a whopping 70% of the flights and approximately 90% of these are short haul, so Green Peace hope that by implementing a scheme resulting in frequent travellers having to pay more tax to fly (increasing with each outbound flight per annum) will ease the strain on airports as people will begin to use trains and other modes of transport. It will also be better for the economy and residents near the airports.

The good news if you only fly once a year as a family holiday… you may not have to pay any tax at all resulting in very cheap flights!

What are your thoughts on this?